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Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Gluten Free Ginger Cake with Caramel Icing (Fructose Friendly!)


Okay friends, here is another one of my recipes that is not only delicious, but can also be enjoyed by folks with special dietary needs. This amazingly moist and rich ginger cake is gluten free, and suitable for people with fructose malabsorption or intolerance. Although, just remember that not everyone is the same, so some ingredients may still irritate some people with these conditions, so if you're making this for a friend, perhaps just ask them about the ingredients first to make sure they are suitable for them :-)


Gluten Free Ginger Cake with Caramel Icing (Also Fructose Friendly :-)

Ingredients:
3/4 cup (165g) firmly packed brown sugar
3/4 cup (110g) Gluten Free plain flour
1/2 cup (75g) Gluten Free self-raising flour
1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
125g butter, softened
2 eggs
2/3 cup (160ml) buttermilk

Caramel Icing
60g butter
1/2 cup (110g) firmly packed brown sugar
3 tablespoons milk
3/4 cup (120g) Icing sugar

Method:
1. Preheat your oven to 170C (150C fan forced oven). Grease a deep 20cm ring pan or bundt tin.
2. Sift sugar, flours, bicarb, ginger, cinnamon and nutmeg into a medium bowl. Add butter, eggs and buttermilk. Beat with an electric mixer on low until all ingredients are combined. Increase the speed to medium and beat for another 2 minutes or until the mixture is smooth and paler in colour.
3. Pour mixture into prepared tin, bake for about 35 minutes. You'll know it's cooked if you poke a skewer into it and it comes out clean. Stand your cake in the pan for about 10 minutes before turning out, and let it rest on a wire cooling rack. Note: If you have used a ring pan, let you cake rest with the topside up. If you have used a bunt tin, let your cake rest topside down :-)

Caramel Icing

Gently heat butter, sugar and milk in a small saucepan over a medium heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Bring to the boil then simmer, stirring for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in sifted icing sugar. Drizzle warm icing over cake.
Now your cake is ready to serve :-)

10 comments:

  1. yum , amd going to try this recipe out soon :]

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  2. sounds yummy! I'll have to give it a try. Now, to find the time to bake. ha ha!

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  3. holy cow, i just made this cake and the fam enjoyed some for desert. It's probably the best GF cake i've ever had let alone baked. Having coeliacs, it's a rare find. Thanks a bunch.

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  4. Ruby Star, that is so great to read! I'm glad you and your family love the cake. I have to admit, I'm a huge fan as well :-) The trick is using buttermilk which reacts with the raising agents to make the cake light and fluffy :-)

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  5. Wow, this cake sounds amazing! Is there a way to make it lactose-free as well?
    ---
    http://fructosefreak.blogspot.com/

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  6. Hi Fructose Freak! Thanks for your comments :-) I'm not sure how this cake would go if you made it lactose free as well, because it's the reaction between the buttermilk and the GF self raising flour that make it so light and fluffy. You might just need to do some baking experimentation :-) Good luck! I'd love to hear about any experiments!!

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  7. Hi Fructose Freak! Thanks for your comments :-) I'm not sure how this cake would go if you made it lactose free as well, because it's the reaction between the buttermilk and the GF self raising flour that make it so light and fluffy. You might just need to do some baking experimentation :-) Good luck! I'd love to hear about any experiments!!

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  8. Sorry, I can't understand how this cake could be suitable to Fructose Intolerance if it has brown sugar (or for that matter any sugar) in the recipe. I thought all sugar was 50% glucose and 50% fructose!!

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  9. Hello Anonymous. Different people have varying degrees of fructose intolerances and/or malabsorption. Sugars aren't necessarily 50% glucose 50% fructose. Also, people with fructose intolerances or fructose malabsorption don't have to avoid any and all fructose entirely (that would almost be impossible), what matters is the ratio of glucose to fructose. If there is a higher ratio of glucose to fructose then it is generally tolerated by people with a fructose intolerance or fructose malabsorption. The glucose helps the body to process the fructose, by giving it a ride, so to speak, meaning the body is able to process and absorb it :-) However, as I always state, everyone is different, and if you have a fructose intolerance or fructose malabsorption you may like to do a little bit of experimentation with different products and ingredients to see what suits of dietary needs :-) I hope this information is helpful to you :-)

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